1. Recognition
Here a man or woman who has dementia is being acknowledged as a person, known by name, affirmed in his or her own uniqueness. Recognition may be achieved in a simple act of greeting, or in a careful listening over a long period - perhaps as a person describes an earlier part of his or her life. Recognition, though, is never purely verbal, and it need not involve words at all. One of the profoundest acts of recognition is simply the direct contact of the eyes.
2. Negotiation
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
3. Collaboration
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
4. Play
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
5. Timalation
This term refers to forms of interaction in which the prime modality is sensuous or sensual, without the intervention os concepts of concepts and intellectual understanding; for example through aromatherapy and massage. The word itself is a neoplasm, derived from the Greek word timao (I honour, and hence I do not violate personal or moral boundaries) and stimulation (with its connotations of sensory arousal). The significance of this kind of interaction is that it can provide contact, reassurance and pleasure, while making very few demands. It is thus particularly valuable when cognitive impairment is severe.
6. Celebration
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
7. Relaxation
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
8. Validation
This term has a long history in psychotherapeutic works going back some time before Naomi Feil made it famous in dementia care. The literal meaning is to make strong or robust; to validate the experience of another is to accept the reality and power of that experience, and hence its 'subjective truth. The heart of the matter is acknowledging the reality of a person's emotions and feelings, and giving a response on the feeling level. Validation involves a high degree of empathy, attempting to understand a person's entire frame of reference, even if it is chaotic or paranoid, or filled with hallucination. When our experience is validated we feel more alive, more connected, more real; there is every ground for supposing that this is true in dementia as well. 
9. Holding
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
10. Facilitation
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
11. Creation
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
12. Giving
The characteristic feature of this type of interaction os that people who have dementia are being consulted about their preferences, desires and needs, rather than being conformed to others' assumptions. Much negotiation takes place over simple everyday issues, such as wether a person feels ready to get up, or have a meal, or go outdoors. Skilled negotiation takes into account the anxieties and insecurities that often pervade the lives of people with dementia, and the slower rate at which they handle information. Negotiation gives even highly dependent people some degree of control over the care that they receive, and puts power back into their hands.
Back to Top